Food & Wine Photo Credit: By CostaPPPR (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Garlic: “One of the most dangerous ingredients in your kitchen”

Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts Chef Julian Bond talks food safety tips.

Forget sharp knives and open flames—garlic is one of the most dangerous things in your kitchen.

In a private demonstration at the Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts, Chef and instructor Julian Bond took Western Living staff on a harrowing journey through food safety and the many unassuming dangers in the kitchen—the first stop? Garlic.

See sprouts? Run the other way!
See sprouts? Run the other way!

Watch Out for Sprouts

When a garlic clove sprouts even the smallest green shoot in its centre, it’s now unsafe for eating. “It’s a perfect garlic if you want to grow garlic,” says Bond. “But this sprout, if moisture gets in here in any shape or form, it’s actually a mild form of salmonella will grow in there and give you an upset belly.” The chef explained that often when diners get an upset stomach after a meal, it’s the garlic—not suspect meat—that’s to blame.

The Dangers of Diced

As Bond explains, chopping garlic is a pain in the butt. “It’s painful, it’s hard, you have to peel it and dice it”—nobody likes to do it, he says. As a result, people might be inclined to save the excess chopped garlic for later, but if it ferments in any way, it will grow botulism. “And botulism will kill you,” says the chef. “Not to be scared of garlic!” he adds.

No shoots, no problem.
No shoots, no problem.

Shopping for Garlic

Make sure when you buy your garlic, it’s tight and sealed. Bond said there shouldn’t be any signs of growth, with the ends twisted up tightly.

Best Place to Store Garlic

Garlic sprouts because of sunlight—it wants to grow. In light of this, Bond has found the perfect storage method: bamboo steamers. “You have airflow … you can cover them so sunlight doesn’t get to them,” he says. And thanks to the vents dry shells simply shake off the garlic and exit through the bottom. The chef recommends bamboo steamers for storing garlic, shallots and even potatoes—with one caveat. “Never put onions and potatoes together, because the onions will germinate the potatoes and start the potatoes to grow,” says Bond. “So always keep them as far away from each other as possible.”

Put those bamboo steamers to good use!
A new way to put those bamboo steamers to good use!

 

Comments

J

*sigh* this is garbage and fear-mongering. Sprouting is not going to spontaneously cause Salmonella to colonize your garlic. There would have to be Salmonella somewhere in the kitchen and in contact with your garlic first. You will not grow botulism on chopped garlic. First, garlic is anti-bacterial, so I doubt saving it for a few days (refrigerated) will be an issue (dear lord, you can buy giant containers of chopped garlic which are certainly not intended to be consumed all at once. Second, Clostridium botulinum, the bacterium which causes botulism, IS ANAEROBIC. Which means it will not reproduce in the presence of air. Which means a clean kitchen will not have Clostridium botulinum growing on the counter to contaminate your garlic. Which is why canned goods can be susceptible if the contents are infected with spores before canning and are not properly processed to kill the organism.

Reply
F

Thanks, J Page, for the sanity.

Reply
D

agreed. I’m surprised this pseudo-science is even published. Fear not. I eat garlic every day! even garlic that has sprouted – I just clip off the sprout and eat it anyway.

Reply
C

Thanks for the good, scientifically correct comment about this silly article.

Reply
R

Silly article — guess they’re trying to scare us away from another healthy food that cures ills and acts as a natural anti-biotic. Anything that is healthy seems to be on their list to outlaw.

Reply
S

I think he’s confused with a real issue re. garlic and botulism, which is if you store it in *oil*, at room temperature, you can get a problem.

(Evidently that’s a traditional-ish method and occasionally people will botulize themselves doing it.

Chopped and then refrigerated, no issues, and “fermented” is irrelevant.)

Reply
A

Agreed

Reply
C

This is absolute garbage. The quality of the writing of the article should give you some clue that this is obviously fear-mongering and nonsense.

Reply
R

No kidding, many times I’ve included the tasty sprouts in my meal and have never had a problem.

Reply
M

Agreed. Everything about this article is illegitimate

Reply
R

I agree Mickey!

Reply

@ J Page – What you say is accurate, but strictly speaking the word anaerobic indicates “without oxygen” not without air.

Reply
a

The Sprout is called “green garlic” and many eat if for extra health benenfits. This is total hooey…who wrote this crap?

Reply
E

Funny. I have been eating garlic with sprouts for many years and didn’t get salmonella or whatever diseases in my 50 or more years of eating. I’m now 70. Big laugh!

Reply
M

Thank you for your reasoned and accurate commentary on this sensationalist rubbish!

Reply
G

Thank you. I just used up my old garlic and the only cloves I threw out were ones that were too dry. Garlic is a good food. I’m a Celiac and have enough restrictions already. Thank you again

Reply

Garlic is great. End of story.

Reply
M

Just what I was thinking…

Reply
C

This article is misleading. Botulism only grows in an anaerobic environment. That means if you put it in oil and leave it out on the counter it could potentially grow botulism. In fact most garlic contains a small amount of botulism, which is not dangerous. Fermented garlic can be delicious and it’s not something to be afraid of. Considering that they didn’t fact check this point, I would be surprised if any of the article was legitimate.

Reply
y

thank you!!!! I have been eating a clover of garlic everyday for 3-4 years now and have not had single cold, and my sinuses have been much less an issue as well…

Reply
M

Thank you for your accurate comments. In Iran, aged and pickled garlic (I have a jar in my fridge that is approximately 27 years old) is quite a delicacy. Since whole cloves with the skins left intact are used, the garlic does not fall apart with time. Instead, the garlic and skins become soft and quite sweet. Pickled garlic is so delicious that I never offer it to guests. I wish that I knew where I could buy some already aged pickled garlic in the Western USA….

Reply
M

The dude from Vancouver is crazy and needs to spend more time in the South of France where Garlic is a staple. I eat so much garlic when I work out I stink. I have never been sick from eating garlic in my 45 years of eating it in huge quantities!

Reply
S

My husband was allergic to garlic and two of three children are “sensitive”. We hardly ever got to eat at a restaurant. Actually, one of the only safe places to eat was McDonalds.

Reply
B

McDonalds…. Safe….. Now that’s funny right there.

Reply
R

LOL !

Reply
C

For their next article, WL presents “You say potato, I say Murder Death Kill.”

Reply

HAHAHA! Thanks for a great laugh. Cat, you are spot on!

Reply
T

HAHA!!

Reply
M

This is terribly inaccurate.
Please issue some kind of correction.
J Page is correct in his comments

Reply
R

True!

Reply
A

LMAO, he’s a chef not a food scientist. Sorry but I’ve been to culinary school and these guys are acting like animals in the kitchen. Half of them don’t even wash their hands and they yell at you if you’re taking too long to wash yours. The only science that’s done is food nutrition and food safety handling and neither talks about garlic magically growing botulism. Yes I used to be a chef until I realized it was a terrible career.

Reply
S

I already knew most of this. Re the sprouts – I remove them and have never had a problem. I use a terra cotta mushroom keeper for my garlic – works well.

Reply
Z

OH! So this is why vampires don’t like it!

Reply
D

Apparently, according to “Julia and Stacey” I be DEAD – killed by eating the only form of BOTULISM that lives happily and amazingly aerobically in the green sprouts of a healthy Garlic bulb. They covered SALMONELLA … what about TOMAINE. I’m sure THAT had something to do with my demise too. That must live in the skin because they covered everything else.
What a load of CRAP – the article, I mean and being dead I shall continue eating my garlic (and so will my DOG) every night until I’m feeling better.

Reply
J

Omg…. this guy is a chef? He obviously wasn’t paying attention in food safety class. The only way salmonella and botulism will get into any plant is if it was cross contaminated with meat or grown in manure. Plants don’t produce those diseases period. It’s either poor preparation in the kitchen or the plants were grown in a contaminated environment. End of story.

Reply
r

really! Garlic has antibiotic properties and this guy is trying to say I will get sick or die from it??? Sorry…this is an article that should never been published.

I must say, I might check out the woven storage container, though.

Reply
a

I should be dead by now with all the garlic sprouted and exposed I have eaten.

Reply
P

This article is false and should be corrected Western Living. At least a retraction of some sort printed up in their magazine.To talk to one chef is very bad researching.

Reply
a

Thanks for the information about garlic

Reply
G

The article is not true! Read the comments from other chefs!

Reply
A

What utter garbage! WL, you should be ashamed for publishing such fallacies. Garlic is one of the most potent antimicrobial foods (antibacterial, antiviral, etc.). It’s one of the best things to prevent and treat colds and flus, maintain healthy gut flora and overall good health. Plus, it makes food taste delicious. It’s a staple in practically every culture. Good luck getting people to believe this crap. LOL!!!

Reply
B

Now I know why I died that one time!

Reply
S

If I didn’t eat sprouted garlic, 99 and 44/100ths percent of the garlic I buy would go from the grocery bag to the compost. Unless you buy from a grower or grow your own, it will be sprouting to some degree when you go to use it.

Reply
C

This is the second time within 2 issues that I have found inaccuracies or the comments have pointed them out. You are starting to break trust in the fact that your writers are not fact checking.

Reply
K

Hi Carol,

Could you tell us the name of the other article that is inaccurate? We’d love to correct these if possible!

Cheers,
Kaitlyn

Reply
B

As a private detective I can say I’ve submitted garlic–even sprouted garlic to a forensic science lab, and there is no salmonella or any other form of contamination. This article is bs, and at the very least I suspect if there is a shred of truth to the writer finding such contamination–that it is cross contamination from something else in his kitchen.

Reply
R

Garlic is good for you, and is excellent for the blood. They are just fear mongering and have no idea what they are talking about. I use tons of garlic in my cooking and am still quite alive and kicking.

Reply
D

On Fodmap they say garlic and onion is a no, no due to stomach issues, any impute?

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Instagram Diary