Events Photo Credit: Western Living

5 Vancouver Makers to Check Out at Address Assembly

The lineup is stacked for the fourth annual Address Assembly pop-up shop and gallery.

Furniture designer Kate Duncan has spent the last three years celebrating local design—her Address Assembly brings Vancouver’s best designers, makers and craftsmen under one roof for a weekend-long pop-up shop and gallery. And this year, she’s pulling out all the stops. The fourth annual event (May 25 to 28) has found a new home at the Ellis Building, where more than 30 exhibitors will participate—the most in Address history. We’ve scouted our faves below, but there’s something for all you design-o-philes out there, from lighting and furniture (including Duncan’s own designs) to ceramics and textiles—and everything in between.


1. Lemonni

If it’s colour you want, look no further than exhibitor Annie Chen, a self-taught graphic designer with a passion for patterns. Her bright and cheerful artwork (flamingos, citrus fruits and funky geometric designs) appear on everything from tea towels and aprons to throw pillows and canvas totes.


2. Eikcam Ceramics

Grace Lee’s ceramics are both whimsical and quirky (to wit: her footed egg cups can easily be used as miniature planters). There are pieces that lean toward the organic, but it’s the vessels with rouge-cheeked visages and playful polka dots that have our attention. Other ceramicists making an appearance at Address include Cathy Terepocki (our first-ever Maker of the Year!) and G Ceramic and Co.


3. Willow and Stump

Furniture design doesn’t get any more Vancouver than this. Kalyca Ryan and Bram Sawatsky joined forces to develop small-space furniture solutions (read more about our former Ones to Watch here) and have since designed an award-winning nightstand, bench-and-clothing-rack-hybrid and an ingenious growler transportation device.


4. Lumota

Your obsession with Scandinavian design can continue thanks to Johnna Puusa’s Lumota collection of himmelis. Traditionally made from straw, himmelis were hung during Finnish harvest festivals to ensure a good crop the following year; Puusa has adapted the hanging ornament for the 21st century with minimal, brass designs.


5. Coastal Craftwork

Coastal Craftwork’s coiled rope vessels—plant baskets, tote bags and jewellery trays!—will hold just about anything. (We’ve already got plans to stow our throw blankets in the Anna 220 basket.)

Address Assembly

May 25 to 28
Ellis Building, 1024 Main St.
addressassembly.com

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